Web apps: personal budget

Searched around Web2.0 for personal finance and budgeting applications (apps). After a little surfing, these apps seemed worth mention. The first may be the best for simple budget tracking…

PearBudget
“Keep in mind, you don’t need to know Excel to use PearBudget. Just look for the cells with the white background and fill in the info the program tells you to. Please don’t touch any cells that don’t have a white background.”
This looks like a user-friendly application; but, as with any tool, there is a learning curve here, too.
Wesabe
“Take control of your money, find the best values in your area, and reach your financial goals by joining the Wesabe community. Wesabe is a community of people who share our experiences with our money so we can help each other make better financial decisions.”
Note: This site allows actual management of accounts. Though you may not want to have all your financial information online, maybe one ‘utility’ account on this site would not be too much of a risk. The site offers a free basic account, and a free trial period for bells and whistles (four months). Site has apparent credibility, given the recommendations I found on other (familiar) weblogs.
Expenses Tracker
“Easily create your own category and sub-category. Generate reports. Track and analyze your spending with customizable reports.”
This app also allows bank account management (see note in Wesabe entry).
mo.neytrack.in

“a free online webapp that allows you to track all your expenses and income easily and without effort, thus allowing you to have a clear view of your financial situation. It intends to be a simple yet powerful online budget management tool.”

To try PearBudget, you’ll need to install it (you can do this!). This is a template for Microsoft Excel, so you already have the software you need to use this application.

  1. Download the .zip file from the website (save it to your desktop)
  2. Unpack it by right-clicking on the desktop icon and selecting to ‘Open’ or ‘Extract’ the file with WinZip (or whatever .zip utility you use).
  3. Open the app from inside Excel (boot Excel, select File>Open, and navigate to the desktop, where you put the file).

If you like the look and feel of PearBudget, you could sign up for an invitation for the private beta that will be sent out when the web-based application goes live. The advantage of a web-based app is that you access it through your browser. That way, when you are at the library, or at a friend’s, anywhere that the Internet is available, you can access the application just as though you were on your desktop at home.

EdTech lunch menu: where to begin

Newbie self starters can catch the edTech wave with a good menu. Lucy Gray posts a good range of edTechie suggestions in the form of a resolution list at Infinite Thinking Machine

“…if you don’t believe in New Year’s resolutions, how about pledging to kick things up a bit in your classroom at least? Here are my suggestions!”

Technorati Profile

M.I.T. OpenCourseWare movement provides content for free

Offering content is the first step. With the changes that are taking place in the information superhighway, BigCo publishing will likely see the trend soon, and begin to open up their own content. This announcement demonstrates the momentum:

By the end of this year, the contents of all 1,800 courses taught at one of the world’s most prestigious universities will be available online to anyone in the world, anywhere in the world.

See: Open content at MIT, Tufts University, Utah State University

And, with help from tools like the OpenCourseWare Finder, we are approaching an open field.